Mon 19 Mar 2018, 6.30–8pm
Cass Research Seminars:
Cass Research Seminar: Asif Din and Annisa Jabbour

Annisa Jabbour - Dubai

Each year PhD students at The Cass submit a report to the Research Students Progress Group, the RD2. The Cass Research Seminar hosts PhD students who wish to present their ideas in advance of the RD2 submission, and this week we have architecture PhD students Asif Din and Annisa Jabbour.

Asif Din: To obtain a life cycle carbon rating system for dwellings a number of parameters have to be established to allow building designers to make decisions within the design process. A measure of the carbon impact of the dwelling builds on previous regulatory and academic knowledge. A building contains hundreds of materials and for any protocol has to be useful to the design of buildings this process and conducted at the earliest opportunity. The trade-off for early measurement is the lack of accuracy obtained. This study finds a useful level of complexity of measurement with a defined detriment to other life cycle carbon processes. This not only takes into account Cradle to Gate impacts but also how the building is likely to perform in a future climate to assess the amount of carbon used during its operation. Careful analysis has taken place on future overheating and its impact on the dwellings life cycle. This thesis provides a league table of significant carbon items within a building and discusses the measurements required for different building typologies. This gives a list of key priorities within the building for a designer to assess in lowering the life cycle carbon in dwellings.

Annisa Jabbour: Views from the Backs of Things. Cycles of decline and renewal can be seen in all cities, arising from the social mobility that gives cities a condition in common that is dealt with in idiosyncratic ways particular to place. This talk will discuss the phenomenon of urban decline and renewal, and how it is dealt with through planning policy and design approaches, in the context of Dubai - a city usually associated with futurism and the generation of brand new real estate.